JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

Development and evaluation of rehabilitation, physiotherapy and assistive technologies, robotics, prosthetics and implants, mobility and communication tools, home automation, and telerehabilitation

Editor-in-Chief:

Peter Rieckmann, MD, FAAN, FEAN, FRCPC - Director, Center for Clinical Neuroplasticity, Medical Park Loipl-Bischofswiesen & Professor of Neurology at Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremburg, Germany


JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies is a PubMed-indexed journal that focuses on the development and evaluation of rehabilitation and assistive technologies, including assistive living.

As an open access journal, JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies is read by both clinicians and patients. The journal fosuses on readable and applied science that reports the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. It publishes original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission to PubMed Central.

Recent Articles

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Robotics in Rehabilitation

BrightArm Compact is a new rehabilitation system for the upper extremities. It provides bimanual training with gradated gravity loading and mediates interactions with cognitively challenging serious games.

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Cognitive and Neurorehabilitation

Persons with multiple sclerosis frequently report increased levels of fatigue and fatigability. However, behavioral surrogates that are strongly associated with self-reports are lacking, which limits research and treatment.

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Reviews on Innovation in Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

Musculoskeletal physiotherapy provides conservative management for a range of conditions. Currently, there is a lack of engagement with exercise programs because of the lack of supervision and low self-efficacy. The use of mobile health (mHealth) interventions could be a possible solution to this problem, helping promote self-management at home. However, there is little evidence for musculoskeletal physiotherapy on the most effective forms of mHealth.

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Innovations in Exercise Rehabilitation

Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) increases exercise capacity, with less clear evidence regarding physical activity (PA). The World Health Organization recommends at least 150-300 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75-150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic PA per week to reduce the risks of chronic disease.

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Reviews on Innovation in Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

Loss of fine motor skills is observed in many neurological diseases, and remote monitoring assessments can aid in early diagnosis and intervention. Hand function can be regularly assessed to monitor loss of fine motor skills in people with central nervous system disorders; however, there are challenges to in-clinic assessments. Remotely assessing hand function could facilitate monitoring and supporting of early diagnosis and intervention when warranted.

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Technology in Physiotherapy

Impaired balance regulation after stroke puts patients and therapists at risk of injury during rehabilitation. Body weight support systems (BWSSs) minimize this risk and allow patients to safely practice balance activities during therapy. Treadmill-based balance perturbation systems with BWSSs are known to improve balance in patients with age- or disease-related impairments. However, these stationary systems are unable to accommodate complex exercises that require more freedom of movement.

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Occupational Therapy and Vocational Rehabilitation

With the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic, shifting active COVID-19 care from short-term acute care hospitals (STACHs) to long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) could decrease STACH census during critical stages of the pandemic and maximize limited resources.

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Theme Issue: The Influence of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Rehabilitation

Although several reports have described the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COVID-19-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), there is a paucity of literature describing the occupational and physical therapy (OT and PT) strategies used in the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting to rehabilitate these patients.

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Portable and Mobile Technologies for Rehabilitation

Musculoskeletal care is now delivered via mobile apps as a health care benefit. Although preliminary evidence shows that the clinical outcomes of mobile musculoskeletal care are comparable with those of in-person care, no research has examined the features of app-based care that secure these outcomes.

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