JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies

Development and evaluation of rehabilitation, physiotherapy and assistive technologies, robotics, prosthetics and implants, mobility and communication tools, home automation, and telerehabilitation.

Editor-in-Chief:

Sarah Munce, MSc, PhD, University of Toronto, Canada


JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies (Editor in Chief: Sarah Munce, PhD) is a PubMed/PubMed CentralSCOPUS, DOAJ, Web of Science, Sherpa/Romeo and EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials indexed journal that focuses on readable and applied science that reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies in the field of rehabilitation.

The journal has a Scopus Citescore of 3.6 and is ranked Q2 (38/146) in the Medicine-Rehabilitation category (74th percentile, so at the brink of being in Q1!) as well as Q2 (69/226) in Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation category.

Recent Articles

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Viewpoints and Perspectives in Rehabilitation and Assist Techn

Lower limb amputation (LLA) impacts physical activity (PA) participation and quality of life (QoL). To minimize the effects of these challenges, LLA survivors need to have opportunities to engage in appropriately tailored rehabilitation throughout their lives. However, in Sri Lanka, where a 3-decade civil war resulted in trauma-related LLA among young male soldiers, access to rehabilitation was limited to the immediate postinjury period. Developing rehabilitation interventions for these veterans requires an understanding of their current health status and rehabilitation perceptions.

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Assistive Technologies

People with intellectual and sensory or sensory-motor disabilities tend to have problems performing multistep tasks. To alleviate their problems, technological solutions have been developed that provide task-step instructions. Instructions are generally delivered at people’s request (eg, as they touch an area of a computer or tablet screen) or automatically, at preset intervals.

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Use and Perceptions of Technology in Everyday Life and for Rehabilitation

People who survive a stroke, in many cases require upper-limb rehabilitation (ULR), which plays a vital role in stroke recovery practices. However, rehabilitation services in the Global South are often not affordable or easily accessible. For example, in Bangladesh, the access to and use of rehabilitation services is limited and influenced by cultural factors and patient’s everyday lives. In addition, while wearable devices have been used to enhance ULR exercises to support self-directed home-based rehabilitation, this has primarily been applied in developed regions and is not common in many Global South countries due to potential costs and limited access to technology.

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Portable and Mobile Technologies for Rehabilitation

The Box and Block Test is a clinical tool used to measure hand dexterity. It serves as an assessment for tracking disease progression or the success of therapy, often benefiting elderly individuals and those with neurological conditions. Digitizing the measurement of hand function may improve the quality of data collection. We have developed and validated a prototype that digitizes this test a prototype that digitizes this test by automatically measuring the time and determining and displaying the test result – the digital Box and Block Test (dBBT).

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Editorial

Rehabilitation supports the affected individual and their caregivers in managing the health condition and its associated symptoms, altering the environment to accommodate needs, adapting tasks for safe and independent performance, facilitating self-management, and using assistive devices and technologies. JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies focuses on pragmatic yet rigorous and impactful science that reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of health innovations and interventions as well as emerging technologies in the field of rehabilitation.

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Portable and Mobile Technologies for Rehabilitation

Physical activity (PA) represents a low-cost and readily available means of mitigating multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms and alleviating the disease course. Nevertheless, persons with MS engage in lower levels of PA than the general population.

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Occupational Therapy and Vocational Rehabilitation

Older adults face barriers to specialty care, such as occupational therapy (OT), and these challenges are worse for rural older adults. While in-home video telehealth may increase access to OT, older adults’ health- and technology-related challenges may necessitate caregiver assistance.

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Occupational Therapy and Vocational Rehabilitation

The acquisition of handwriting skills is essential for a child’s academic success, self-confidence, and general school performance. Nevertheless, an estimated 5% to 27% of children face handwriting challenges, where the ability to modulate pressure on the pencil and lead on the paper is a key motor component.

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Telerehabilitation

Digital interventions provided through smartphones or the internet that are guided by a coach have been proposed as promising solutions to support the self-management of chronic conditions. However, digital intervention for poststroke self-management is limited; we developed the interactive Self-Management Augmented by Rehabilitation Technologies (iSMART) intervention to address this gap.

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Telerehabilitation

Youth (age 15-24 years) with and without disability are not adequately represented enough in exercise research due to a lack of time and transportation. These barriers can be overcome by including accessible web-based assessments that eliminate the need for on-site visitations. There is no simple, low-cost, and psychometrically sound compilation of measures for physical fitness and function that can be applied to youth with and without mobility disabilities.

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Use and Perceptions of Technology in Everyday Life and for Rehabilitation

Musculoskeletal pain is a prevalent concern among diverse populations, from the average individual to the elite athlete. Handheld percussive massage therapy devices like massage guns have gained much popularity in both medical and athletic settings. Its application has been prominently recognized in injury prevention and rehabilitation. The expansion of the market to provide handheld percussive therapy devices with varying features and price points has encouraged professional and novice use. While percussive therapy holds similarities to more studied therapeutic modalities, like vibration therapy and soft tissue mobilization, there is limited evidence-based information on the indications and contraindications.

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Disabilities

Transosseous distraction osteosynthesis is prioritized in orthopedic care for children with achondroplasia. However, difficulties encountered during treatment and rehabilitation directly impact patients’ quality of life. Using rod external fixators within a semicircular frame for osteosynthesis is less traumatic compared to spoke circular devices. Their straightforward assembly and mounting on the limb segment can help significantly reduce treatment duration, thereby improving children’s quality of life during treatment and rehabilitation.

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